pimp my truck

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I eventually had to leave the little village:

leaving Tuotuo

Ran into two bikers on the way:

biker dudes

They were going home to their native town of Jinghe, a rather big settlement about 65 kilometers from here. I was very much looking forward to that place – clean sheets, Internet, food en masse…

But before that, there was some more of the highway to conquer:

highway

At one point, I saw a sign pointing to a train station in the middle of nowhere:

train station

I was tempted to go there to spend a few hours in the shade, but when I took out the telephoto to take a closer look, it didn’t look very inviting:

building

These guys stopped and gave me a melon:

construction crew

Then this guy stopped and gave me a melon:

This gentleman gave me a watermelon

It was hot, and the Caboose was happily rolling along:

I took a shot from below too:

But there was no shade anywhere to be found:

curve

Just as I was about to feel my brain starting to softly boil in my skull, there was this parking bay next to the road. I found a truck and asked if I could hang out in its shade:

truck

And then, when the first truck was gone, I found another one:

camp

I ate one of my melons and slept for a while. Then I walked around the truck, just to find out that it was in fact two trucks parked right next to each other:

trucker buddies

Why, you ask?

Look closer:

cool dude

Like a baws.

…and then it was out into the Gobi again:

Gobi

I was listening to metal from Sweden when I ran into Erik from Sweden, a guy who had cycled here from his home:

Erik

And what a happy camper he was!

When I saw some lights in the distance, I was happy that I probably wouldn’t have to camp.

It was a tiny settlement next to the train station of Jinghe, basically just a few food stands, stores and repair shops:

settlement

I found a Uyghur restaurant and asked the owner if I could spend the night there. He was a kind man with a large family:

chair photo

We had dinner…

This Uyghur family gave me shelter for the night

…and he invited me to spend the night on his front porch.

It turned out to be a hard night though, mainly out of two reasons, the first one being the bugs that were swirling around the place, and the second one being the endless noise of vehicles passing by:

…but then some of the vehicles turned out to be pretty cute:

I closed my eyes and tried to ignore the bugs.



  • Elena

    Wow wow wow… You just IGNORE the bugs??? Tough guy you are!

    Reply

  • RUBEN CISTERNAS

    INCREIBLE TRAVESÍA , GRAN EXPERIENCIA , UN ENCUENTRO CON TU SER, ALIMENTANDO EL ALMA DE LA VIDA.

    FELICITACIONES POR ESTE ENCREIBLE VIAJE .

    ENVIDIA SANA –

    ABRAZOS Y SALUDOS

    RICS

    Reply

  • Qifeng

    It is really nice to see you continue it again

    Reply

  • Kristian

    Dude tell us more about the Swedish guy!
    Did he know English? how long had he been biking?

    Reply

  • Lilu

    Hehe, der Typ in der Hängematte ist super!

    Reply

  • Neil Sandage

    What Kristian asked. Had he really cycle there from Sweden? Where did he begin his bike ride? What languages did he speak?

    I have done much hiking, so I know I am good for many distances. But studying and knowing the language PLUS making friends (your ability to make friends is wonderful), and is the difference between a dreamer like myself and someone who is really living an adventure.

    What you are doing is a real measure of how cultures traveled and met. People walked their animals, because it was more beneficial for the animals to carry food and commodities than to carry people. The world survived by walking the animals who did the work.

    Reply

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