the line between old and new

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Today I went to an unimposing door:

door of Angurestan-e-malek

And behind that door, there was a caretaker:

caretake of Angurestan-e-malek

See the mark on his forehead? It usually means that he is a pious man who takes his prayers very seriously, as the Shia use little stones upon which they place their foreheads when they bow down to pray:

stone block

Anyway, the caretaker was in charge of a merchant’s mansion from times long past:

grammophone in Angurestan-e-malek

It was called Angurestan-e-malek.

The merchant, a gentleman called Malek Al Tojjar, was long dead, and he had been laid to rest in his house:

inside Angurestan-e-malek

With a qur’an:

Qur’an

I hadn’t come there alone, though – Rana and Nasrin from the square were showing me around:

with Rana and Nasrin

They had brought a dish made from dates and honey:

honey dish

It was very sweet. I think it would have been too sweet for many people, but I am German and therefore a meister of eating sweet things. Nothing is too sweet for me.

We went to Chehel Sotoun, a pavilion behind a pool in a park.

pool of Chehel Sotoun

It had bunch of pillars and was most nice to look at, but I somehow managed to forget to take a picture of it from the outside.

I was busy taking photos of people taking photos:

inside Chehel Sotoun

And of the ceiling, which was exquisite:

ceiling of Chehel Sotoun

One thing that I appreciate about Iranian culture is the way that many ancient monuments are being preserved during renovations. Check out this part of the ceiling, for example:

restaurations in Chehel Sotoun

The old parts and the new parts are strictly separate from each other. In China or Central Asia, this would have probably been made to look perfectly new (or old), and you wouldn’t have been able to tell which parts were genuinely ancient.

Rana and Nasrin gave me a lollipop:

lollipop

And then we said goodbye.



  • Danielle

    “I think it would have been too sweet for many people, but I am German and therefore a meister of eating sweet things. Nothing is too sweet for me.”

    So this was interesting to me. My ex was German and when we lived over there, I found their sweet things to be more gently sweet and nuanced compared to the way too sugary sweet everything is in the U.S. His parents would even tell me that this is the norm there, that Germans and Europe in general do not go overboard with the sugar in their pastries and confections and things will be more subtly sweet. It suited my tastes perfectly as I’ve never been much of a sugarholic.

    Reply

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