Monthly Archives: June 2017

back to Kaji-Say

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Got into another marshrutka today: It was going to take me into the mountains and up to lake Issyk-kul. The ride took four hours, and this was my view out of the window: We stopped only once on our way up: And then I was finally there, in Kaji-Say, a small village on the Southern […]


98,0

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Took a walk through sunny Bishkek: It felt very different from the last time I had been there. There seemed to be more optimism in the air. I guess the sun and the blue sky made all the difference. I went directly to the Tsum (Цум), a large shopping center: I wanted to get a […]


a ride through last September

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I grabbed my stuff and went to the bus station. Having taken the marshrutka to the Kyrgyz border several times before, I knew my way around pretty well. But I was surprised to find these posters advertising the border area of Khorgas (the one that I had previously crossed on my shitty little bicycle) as […]


tears of a hooligan

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Rain in Almaty: So I stayed in. And I learned two things. 1) Remember the big fat black cat Sarkozy, the one who had been my sworn enemy the last time I stayed here? Well, there were more of his kind now, and they were actually quite nice: 2) Remember the little kid from last […]


one thing bout tacos when they hit you feel no pain

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I arrived in Almaty at around nine in the morning: I went to the hostel where I had been staying almost a year ago. I was a bit worried that the people there wouldn’t be able to recognize me with my beard and all, but they just smiled and said: “Oh, it’s you!” Then they […]


meeting with me

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Went to Tashkent railway station today: In Uzbekistan, you are told to arrive forty minutes before your train departs. I usually try to be there at least an hour early. So I hung out in the waiting hall until the train arrived: I felt excited – how would our train pass the border? Would we […]


run from the hanger

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Another day in Tashkent, waiting for my train. I helped a lady from New Zealand get certificates for a few suzanis she had purchased. I was pretty good at that by now. Then we sat down and talked. Why had we decided to travel? I said I just liked to experience things. She said her […]


Party Down is boss

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Stayed in. Sorted some pictures. I had taken more than 18.000 photos in just four weeks (mainly because of the many time-lapse shots). And while I was sorting through my endless archives I watched some Party Down, which is one of the best things to have ever lived on TV: Seriously, this thing getting cancelled […]


dinner alone

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Just like that, she was gone. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . And I had dinner: Alone.


this is what you can’t wear

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With the rejection of my third attempt at getting a Turkmen visa (and her attempt at obtaining a transit visa rejected as well), we started making plans for the weeks ahead. She was going to leave via airplane, and I was going to take a train out of Tashkent. So we went to the train […]


how to get certified

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Remember how we were told to get certificates for the hand-made suzanis we had bought a few days ago? Well, today we went and had them examined and certified, and because the road there wasn’t very easy I will try to share with you what I know: If you have bought hand-made articles like suzanis, […]


the best lagman in Tashkent

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If you want lagman, the hearty Central Asian noodle dish, you need to find an Uyghur chef. Everyone knows that they are the best when it comes to noodle-making. My personal favorite lagman-place in Tashkent is this one: Binket near Chorsu Bazaar. I marked it for you on the map. If you ask a taxi […]


mail fail

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We were about to go back to Tashkent today. But first we had to think of a way to get rid of the suzani we had bought: They were too heavy to lug around, especially if I was going to do any serious walking in the months to come. So we went to the main […]


I like shopping

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Something happened this morning: Something that led to a supreme vantage point: It didn’t last long: But it was good while it lasted. The day was still young when we took a half-hour drive to Urgut, a village in the southeast of Samarkand. Urgut was famous for its bazaar. When we got there, it was […]


Timurland

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We went to Shahrisabz today, a small town located about an hour south of Samarkand. It is known as the birthplace of Timur (or Tamerlan), and apparently he had initially planned to turn it into the capital of his empire instead of Samarkand. Well, plans change sometimes. He did build a large palace for himself […]


the noodle prophet

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I wanted to take pictures of the sunrise, so I got up at 4:30 in the morning and walked over to the Registan. After the sun had come up, I ran into a Japanese gentleman who was in Samarkand with a tour group: He was very enthusiastic about everything. Then she came and picked me […]


drunken swag

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So we went and looked at some graves today: They were in Shah-i-Zinda, a mausoleum complex in the northern part of the city: The site was fairly large: Some of the mausoleums were richly decorated: While others looked rather simple – but only from the outside: Because from the inside, every single one… …was spectacular: […]


one thousand and one big fat penises

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There was a palace called Nurullaboy Saroyi just outside of Khiva’s gates: It was apparently well worth a visit, but alas! it was closed for renovations, as we were told by this friendly lady: We had already booked train tickets to Samarkand, so we just got some ice cream and sat down in front of […]


up the ladder to the roof

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We woke up late and had some fried fish in a restaurant outside of the city walls: There were things to see there as well… …but we ignored them and went back to the old town. To Tash Khauli, to be exact: This palace from the early 19th century had elaborately decorated wooden pillars… …and […]


equals S?

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The train ride was in fact two train rides. One to Navoiy, a place that I had previously walked through, and the other to Urgench, a city close to Khiva in the Northwest of Uzbekistan. The stopover in Navoiy was a bit strange, though, as we had to leave the train not on a platform […]